Veterans Reportedly Overcome PTSD

Researchers have announced findings showing that PTSD may be successfully cured in veterans within six therapy sessions, without drugs, bringing the possibility of help for around 300,000 troops returning from Iraq or Afghanistan experiencing traumatic stress disorders.  

 

According to a pilot study published in the latest issue of the peer-reviewed International Journal of Healing and Caring, veterans with high levels of PTSD saw their PTSD levels drop to within normal limits after treatment. They reported that combat memories that had previously haunted them, including graphic details of deaths, mutilations, and firefights, dropped in intensity to the point where they no longer resulted in flashbacks, nightmares, and other symptoms of PTSD. The study involved veterans from Vietnam, as well as more recent conflicts.  

 

One Vietnam veteran in the study had been obsessed by the details of his best friend’s killing for 40 years. When the two of them went on patrol, his friend always walked to his left. On the day of his death, his friend was on his right, and the veteran believed for decades that “my buddy took the sniper’s bullet that was meant for me.” After treatment, his guilt evaporated, and he realized that “my buddy would willingly have died for me.”  

 

Practitioners in the study had veterans report the emotional intensity of such memories on a scale from zero to 10, with 10 being very intense, and zero being no intensity. They reported that, over the course of the six sessions, the intensity of most combat memories dropped to zero, and remained there subsequently. Measured on standardized psychological questionnaires, the PTSD levels of veterans in the study dropped by 50 percent. Their scores also dropped by 49 percent for depression and 46 percent for anxiety, indicating that other psychological problems that often accompany PTSD improved too.  

 

The method used involves the veterans recounting their memories of combat trauma, while rubbing or tapping 14 specific acupuncture points on their bodies. Scientists theorize that linking the mental recall of emotionally disturbing incidents to the physical stimulation used by EFT makes the person’s body feel secure. This associates an unsafe memory with a safe physical stimulus, which breaks the link between the emotional trauma and physical stress. After EFT treatments, veterans are still able to remember the incidents, but without an emotional charge.  

 

The pilot study is the first step in a large nationwide study of EFT and veterans currently taking place. The pilot study produced statistically highly significant results with just 7 veterans, while the national study is collecting data from over 100 veterans with PTSD. Both are being conducted by the Iraq Vets Stress Project.

 

With up to one in four returning veterans reporting PTSD, as well as other psychological problems, the military has been increasingly open to new approaches. Such studies are a first step to implementing effective new therapies in the Veterans Administration system, according to Dr. Stephen Ezeji-Okoye, head of the VA Field Advisory Committee on Complementary and Alternative Medicine. His office examines potential alternative therapies that can help veterans. If the clinical trials show good results, he says, they’re “exactly the sort of thing we want to take a look at.”  

 

Dr. Dawson Church, the Stress Project’s director, says, “I’m hoping our society does not repeat the mistakes of Vietnam, where we brought a quarter million troops back home without adequate PTSD treatment. That’s why I’m so interested in therapies like EFT, that are fast, safe and effective.”

 

Dawson Church, Ph.D., founded Soul Medicine Institute to research and teach emerging psychological and medical techniques. He is CEO of Energy Psychology Press, publisher of cutting-edge alternative healing / integrative medicine books. His newest book, The Genie in Your Genes, investigates the remarkable self-healing mechanisms now emerging in this field.

Related Help For Veterans Articles

Help for Veterans | Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, Are You Reliving The Past?

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Common among war veterans, rape victims, and others who can experience terrifying events, post-traumatic stress disorder is a condition that is characterized by the gripping fear persistent due to flashback thoughts of an ordeal. Post-traumatic stress disorder, also called PTSD can hurt a person’s work, social, and family lives.

There are numerous of horrible events that could cause one to experience PTSD symptoms. Besides those listed above, these include: child abuse, violent attacks, threats, natural disasters, and accidents. In any case, there is usually a sense of helplessness and tragic danger. However simply witnessing a horrible event can cause PTSD.

PTSD has a number of distinct symptoms that can help you diagnoses your own condition. There include nightmares about the event, avoidance of thoughts or feelings, difficulty remembering the experience, irritability, difficulty concentrating, emotional drain, guilt, feelings of distance from family and friends. Having one or two of these symptoms does not necessarily mean you’re suffering from PTSD, and not everyone experiencing an event will develop this anxiety disorder. Generally, you should see a doctor is these symptoms last after one month.

Treatment for PTSD is very important because the disorder can lead you to miss work or school and have trouble socializing. Having PTSD is nothing to be ashamed of-over 5 million America adults alone say they have this disorder. PTSD affects anyone, regardless of age, race, economic status, religion, or gender, although more women than men tend to have PTSD. When something tragic happens that you experienced and you can’t move on, PTSD is a likely disorder to develop, no matter who you are or what you look like.

Thankfully, there are a few ways to treat PTSD. Therapy is a very good way to talk about your problems, and it can also help you from experiencing PTSD from the beginning. Remember to tell you therapist the truth about everything and ask for advice whenever you feel like you need it to avoid never-wracking situations, like panic disorders or flashbacks.

Medication is also possible to help people deal with PTSD. If PTSD is left untreated, the results could be other anxiety disorders, depression, sleeping problems, substance abuse, and a lowered immune system. You can win the fight against PTSD! Treatment in all forms is available that will help you move on with your life or find closure. Seek professional help today if you are concerned about yourself having PTSD

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